Butternut Squash Miso Carbonara

This shop has been compensated by Collective Bias, Inc. and its advertiser. All opinions are mine alone. #BarillaGlutenFree #CollectiveBias. Miso & Butternut Squash Carbonara – a vegetarian, fall rendition of the Italian classic with toasted walnuts, crispy sage and an unexpected punch of umami goodness from miso paste.

overhead shot of a plate with Miso & Butternut Squash Carbonara topped with chopped walnuts, crispy sage leaves and grated parmesan cheese

I’m putting a little pause on all things pumpkin for the moment to bring you what is quite possibly my new favorite fall pasta dish: Miso & Butternut Squash Carbonara.

It’s my personal opinion that butternut squash doesn’t get nearly as much love as it deserves this time of year, overshadowed by all the pumpkin spice everything recipes that hit the internet like a ton of bricks every October. I’m not saying I don’t love it, I just think butternut squash needs its moment in the sun, too.

One of my favorite ways to highlight butternut squash is in a pasta dish- if you’re familiar with my vegan butternut squash mac and cheese recipe, you’ll know this to be true. But today I’m delighted to partner with Barilla to bring you this Butternut Squash Carbonara, made with their gluten-free spaghetti!

Why this recipe for Butternut Squash Carbonara works:

  • This vegetarian Carbonara is a simple, easy weeknight meal you can whip up in 25 minutes, yet it’s classy and elegant – perfect for company.
  • The hot pasta cooks the added egg resulting in a luxuriously creamy carbonara sauce without using any cream whatsoever.
  • Sweet roasted butternut squash, toasty walnuts and crispy fried sage add tons of flavor to this fall-inspired pasta dish.
  • Miso paste increases the umami factor and makes this vegetarian pasta extra savory.

a big oval plate of Miso & Butternut Squash Carbonara with fried sage leaves, grated parmesan and chopped walnuts on a rustic white table

A word about gluten-free pasta:

Barilla’s gluten-free pasta is made from rice and corn, and I honestly don’t miss the gluten one bit. Some gluten-free kinds of pasta just don’t taste the same as regular pasta, or they become way too mushy and fall apart when cooking, but the flavor and texture of Barilla gluten free pasta are on point!

I usually keep gluten-free pasta in the house for everyday meals, and I’m so excited to have found one that actually compares to regular pasta in taste and feel. It has that perfect al dente texture that was absolutely necessary for this Miso & Butternut Squash Carbonara.

ingredients for Butternut Squash Carbonara arranged on a white rustic tabletop

If you’ve ever had traditional carbonara pasta, you’ll know that the sauce is comprised of egg and parmesan (with lots of black pepper thrown in for good measure), and that the hot cooked pasta actually cooks the egg as you toss it with the sauce, resulting in a rich, silky sauce without using any cream whatsoever.

a plate of Butternut Squash Miso Carbonara with sage and walnuts next to a small bowl with walnuts

Traditional carbonara also normally contains bacon, but since I’m keeping my version vegetarian, we’re relying on sweet roasted butternut squash, toasty walnuts and crispy fried sage (aka the fall flavor trifecta) to add tons of flavor to this Miso & Butternut Squash Carbonara.

I loved the idea of adding savory miso paste to the mix, too! I’ve seen it done before and wanted to include it here in my fall-inspired version of this Italian classic, especially since without bacon the dish really needed a punch of umami flavor.

close-up of a Butternut Squash Carbonara with walnuts, sage and parmesan served in an oval bowl with a wooden spoon on the side

The finished butternut squash pasta is silky and smooth without feeling heavy, with sweet, savory and earthy notes all wrapped up in a bowl of fall goodness. I know this Butternut Squash Miso Carbonara is going to be a new fall classic that you’ll want to make over and over again.

My tips for making the perfect Carbonara:

  • Visible black specks of pepper are a must when serving carbonara. Make sure to use freshly ground pepper. It adds a wonderful heat to the finished Butternut Squash Carbonara.
  • Hot pasta water is perfect for loosening pasta dishes as it contains starch, which adds to the silkiness of the finished sauce. Feel free to add a small amount of hot pasta water when tossing the drained pasta with the egg mixture.
  • Do resist the temptation to return the pasta to the hot stove when tossing.  Your eggs will start to scramble at about 70C, so the heat from the just-boiled pasta water will be more than enough to thicken the yolks into a velvety sauce.
  • This Butternut Squash Carbonara should be served as soon as it’s ready. Prepare and measure out everything you need before you start cooking and make sure the table is set.

a fork with coiled pasta in a small bowl of Butternut Squash Miso Carbonara on a wooden table

Variations on this Butternut Squash Carbonara:

  • Roasted Kabocha squash is the perfect substitution for butternut squash. It’s a bit sweeter than butternut squash, with a firm flesh and an edible skin.
  • For an extra rich and creamy carbonara sauce, swap one of the eggs for 2 egg yolks.
  • If you don’t like walnuts, feel free to use pecans instead.
  • I opted for classic spaghetti but a flat pasta like fettuccine or tagliatelle also work really well.

FAQ:

How to roast butternut squash in the oven?

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. Wash, peel (optional, you can actually eat the skin) and chop the squash into cubes. Toss butternut squash cubes with olive oil and garlic in a large bowl. Season with salt and black pepper. Arrange the coated squash on a lined baking sheet and roast it until the squash is tender and lightly browned, for roughly 25 minutes.

What to do with leftover  Butternut Squash Carbonara?

I’d recommend reheating leftovers in a pan and adding a splash of water or broth to help revive the carbonara sauce. If you like to prep your meals in advance, you could boil all the pasta and roast all the squash the first time, and then do the sauce step fresh each time you plan to serve it.

Thanks to Barilla for sponsoring this post, and thanks for reading Le Petit Eats! To keep up with my kitchen escapades, follow me on FacebookInstagramTwitter and Pinterest. If you make this recipe, please share it using the hashtags #BarillaGlutenFree and #LePetitEats!

Butternut Squash Miso Carbonara

Butternut Squash Miso Carbonara- a vegetarian, fall rendition of the Italian classic with walnuts, sage and a punch of umami goodness from miso paste.

Course Main Course
Cuisine Italian, Japanese
Keyword creamy, easy, fall, miso, pasta, sage, squash, unique, vegetarian, walnuts
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Total Time 25 minutes
Servings 4 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt plus more for pasta water
  • 1 pound gluten free spaghetti
  • 2 garlic cloves minced
  • 2 large eggs plus 1 large egg yolk
  • 2 1/2 tablespoons red or yellow miso paste
  • 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper plus more for serving
  • 1 1/4 cups finely grated Parmesan plus more for serving
  • 1 lb butternut squash peeled, cubed and roasted
  • 1/2 cup walnuts toasted
  • 1/4 cup sage leaves fried until crisp

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together garlic, eggs and egg yolk, miso paste, 1/4 teaspoon salt, and 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper. Set aside.

  2. Bring a 6- to 8-quart pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add spaghetti to boiling water and cook according to package directions until spaghetti is al dente.

  3. Drain in a colander and immediately toss the hot pasta with the miso and egg mixture with tongs until combined. Add half of the parmesan and toss to combine. Add the remaining parmesan and toss until the pasta is coated in a silky, cheesy sauce. Add butternut squash, walnuts and sage and toss gently.
  4. Divide pasta among four bowls, top with more Parmesan and cracked black pepper, and serve immediately.

 

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Comments

  1. Susie

    Hi Denise, The recipe looks good and I love butternut squash as well. But we never buy Barilla products since the owner has publicly announced that the glbt community can buy elsewhere. So no problem there. 🏳️‍🌈

    Reply
  2. Abby

    Does this hold up as next-day leftovers, or for two people should I cut the recipe in half and make it two days in a row?

    Reply
    1. Denisse Post author

      It should, I’d recommend reheating in a pan and adding a splash of water or broth to help revive the sauce. On the other hand you could boil all the pasta and roast all the squash the first time, and then do the sauce step fresh each time you plan to serve it. Hope that helps!

      Reply

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